Structural Biology of Natural Product Biosynthesis

Our work uses a variety of techniques to study protein structure and function;

The main goal of our work is to figure out how enzymes use specific structures to catalyze interesting chemical reactions. We use a variety of techniques, including molecular and structural biology, as well as enzymology and other biophysical tools to understand protein structure and function. We have additionally developed novel chemical inhibitors that can be used to probe protein function in biological systems.

In particular, we are focused on Natural Product Biosynthesis and the fascinating proteins that bacteria use to make novel chemicals. Our lab is interested in understanding the enzymatic basis for these biosynthetic pathways, as well as the role that novel compounds play in bacterial growth and pathogenesis.

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Main Projects

While we are broadly interested in structure and function of a variety of enzymes, we have focused our attention on several enzyme families that are involved in natural product biosynthesis.

Adenylate Forming Enzymes

A family of adenylate forming enzymes that include acyl-CoA synthetases, NRPS adenylation domains, and beetle luciferase enzymes.

Table of ANL Enzyme Crystal Structures

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Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases

NRPS enzymes are large, modular assembly line proteins that produce important peptides, including antibiotics and siderophores.

Table of NRPS Enzyme Crystal Structures

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Siderophores and NIS synthetases

Many bacteria produce hydroxamate siderophores for iron acquisition, using a family of ligases that catalyze amide linkages.

Table of NIS Synthetase Crystal Structures

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Publications

Some recent publications from our lab.
Gulick Publications

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Contact Information

Andrew M. Gulick
Professor, Department of Structural Biology
Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences
University at Buffalo
955 Main St.
Buffalo, NY 14203-1121
PH (716)829-3696
My School of Medicine Faculty Page

Admission to our graduate program occurs through the PPBS, an interdisciplinary PhD Program in Biological Sciences at UB.