Currrent Teaching (University at Buffalo)

  • Present 2019

    BMS 516: Fundamentals of Biomedical Research II

    I am an instructor of this course, which is offered every Fall semester to the graduate students of Biomedical Sciences.  This course is a combination of lectures and research paper discussions and is required for all students in the PhD Program in Biomedical Sciences (PPBS).  This course teaches students to research methods, experimental design, data analysis, and critical thinking.  My part focuses on discussing a research article from the literature on computational microscopy image analysis, as well as discussing computational image analysis fundamentals. 

  • Present 2019

    BMS 515: Fundamentals of Biomedical Research I

    I am an instructor of this course, which is offered every Fall semester to the graduate students of Biomedical Sciences.  This lecture course is required for all students in the PhD Program in Biomedical Sciences (PPBS).  Goal is to teach students fundamental concepts important to a broad range of biomedical research topics.  My part focuses on discussing an overview of microscopy for viewing different samples at different scales, technical concerns/limitations of each, spatial resolution, specific examples of each type of microscopy, basics of microscopy image analysis, image segmentation, feature extraction, and feature classification.

  • Present 2019

    PAS 514: Seminar

    I am an instructor of this course, which is offered every Fall semester to Pathology department's graduate students.  This course aims to improve scientific literacy beyond the boundary of the students' laboratory's sub-specialty.  Focus is given to improve students' presentation skills.  Students practice recognizing, extracting and summarizing the key elements from a scientific talk.  Each student presents a formal 45 minute presentation on a research topic of their choosing, with slides, followed by a 10 minute question-answer period.  My part focuses on discussing a research article from the literature on computational microscopy image analysis, as well as discussing computational image analysis fundamentals. 

  • Present 2018

    PAS 520: Microscopic Imaging

    I am an instructor of this course, which is offered every year to Pathology department's graduate students.  This course in general provides graduate students with fundamental training in modern optical microscopy and biomedical imaging.  My part focuses on discussing computational methods used in the analysis of fluorescence microscopy images, deconvolution microscopy, as well as fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy instrumentation, imaging, and analysis.

  • Present 2018

    PAS 505: Microscopic Anatomy & Computational Methods

    I am an instructor of this course, which is offered every Fall semester.  My part in the course is designed for Pathology department's graduate students.  This course in general discusses the function and structure of microscopic structures of the body.  My part introduces the use of computational methods used in the analysis of histological images of these microscopic structures.

  • Present 2016

    BE 461/561: Introduction to Biomedical Image Analysis

    I am the director of this course, and offer this course every Fall semester.  The course is designed for BE seniors and first year graduate students.  This course focuses on computational quantification of biologically relevant micro/macroscopic structures in biomedical images.  Students will learn how (i) raw data is acquired before digitization;  (ii) to read, display, and interpret various medical image data types using a computer;  (iii) to detect, segment, and quantify heterogeneous structures in biomedical images;  (iv) to leverage features extracted from biomedical images for classification;  (v) to setup experiments in MATLAB via script writing for biomedical image analysis.  Image analysis problems related to fluorescence and brightfield microscopy and fluorescence molecular tomography systems and corresponding biomedically relevant computational image analysis tools will be discussed.  Simulated and real images of these systems will be used for quantitative analysis via MATLAB based script writing.

Lecture Videos & Teaching Materials

Teaching History (Washington University in St. Louis)

  • 2009 2007

    Linear Algebra & Matrix Calculus, Math Stats, Linear Models, Multivariates, and Detection & Estimation Theory (Study Group Instructor)

    My classes usually had 10-15 participants. Responsibility was teaching as well as assigning, grading, and correcting homeworks for junior graduate students. I was also responsible to prepare and update the lecture notes of these classes. Each of these course materials consists of dedicated handouts, lecture notes, and problem sets.