Verum

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Verum

The title of my project is called Verum, which is Latin for “The Truth”. This project is an attempt to use video games and various media icons born from them, to provide a commentary on modern day life. This goes off of the basis that Videogames, as a form of media, are reflections on society and its values, conspicuous or otherwise. For example Games like Call of Duty or Battlefield or Medal of Honor are in some ways the byproducts of America's current War on Terror, existing in part to explore a fascination with military conflicts in the Middle East and abroad. Many of these games also seek to provide commentary about key issues in the media such as stereotypes, fears, dreams and expectations. In gaming a key attribute to a good game is authenticity, for a game to effective bring the player into the spectacle they must almost forget that they are playing a game. The best way to do that is to model the game after real life things that the player may have already seen before. The game must be believable, that is why is in Call Of Duty, and Battlefield the enemies are almost always one of three groups: The Russians, The Chinese, or Islamic terrorists. Game developers must have a believable plot with believable enemies so it’s no surprise that they use groups that the United States in particular has rocky relations with and the threat. Moral views are also thrown into video games, things such as racism and sexism, are inserted into videogames, intentional or not. For example the well-known game Tomb Raider is an excellent example of sexism in video games first and foremost demonstrated through Lara Croft herself, who in the beginning is no more than a busty bombshell with guns. It is only until just recently when the series was rebooted that the character was redone (By a female developer) to be a more fleshed out character with a personality and genuine background. Another interesting facet of video games is that they also offer up new questions and observations on society based on how users decided to play the games. For instance why is it that some players when playing for example, build a replica of a Nazi death camp? Or why is it fun for people to pose a drug dealer in an improvised neighborhood who kills and steals and is gang affiliated? These are the types of questions video games force us to ask ourselves.