Schedule B

 

For the next 5 weeks, we’ll be reading and writing about the American frontier, a boundary that moved ever westward in the nineteenth century as people traded, ranched, farmed, and mined the land, built towns and cities, and instituted governments. Though historians can document the myriad of events that constituted frontier living, the significance of the American frontier has become controversial since the historian Frederick Jackson Turner formulated a thesis about the frontier that has permeated all ideas about America, including popular literature and the movies. We’ll start with the excerpt from Turner’s The Significance of the Frontier in American History and continue with writers who take exception to Turner’s thesis, particularly where women and Native Americans are concerned.

 

q   As you read, underline main ideas, jot down questions and ideas for further study. At the end of each reading, there are ideas for rereading and for writing about the texts. Just thinking about these suggestions will help you understand and remember what you have read (oddly enough, students often come to class, after reading any assignment, unable to remember much about what they have read!!).

q   GOALS: To understand differing opinions about complex ideas

(Note that not all opinions on equal; opinions based on verifiable information and on your evaluating other people’s opinions are superior to opinions you hold because your friends and family believe they are right)

To evaluate differing interpretations of events (treated as facts) and the importance of point of view in understand and constructing interpretations

To begin the process of building your own interpretations

 

You should also review pp. 11-22 on common errors in student writing in The Everyday Writer. Many students come to college without having learned what we sometimes call the “writing mechanics”—placing commas where they belong; keeping nouns and their verbs, nouns and pronouns, in agreement with one another; writing complete sentences instead of fragments and comma splices, and so on. Errors in grammar and punctuation will give you low grades on your papers. So, learn to correct errors in your papers before your instructor catches them!

 

 

WEEK 1

DATE

IN CLASS

HOMEWORK

M Aug 27

 

Introduction of the syllabus. How writing in college may differ from writing in high school.

The DAILIES (in computer classroom)

Ÿ   Begin a one-page introduction of yourself. Include any information you think is relevant to your role as a writer in ENG 101.

Finish self-introduction and deposit in drop box.

 

Read in CC: Turner, pp. 527-541 (middle of page).

W Aug 29

Clemens 128

Ÿ   At computers: Discussion board on Turner (20 min.).

Ÿ   Open Turner.doc. The text you have just read is in the left-hand column. Highlight Turner’s main ideas and anything else he writes that provokes your interest. In the left-hand column comment on the passages you have just highlighted. (Continue this exercise for the rest of the Turner reading at home.)

Read in CC: Turner, pp. 541-553 (continue highlighting and commenting in Turner.doc).

F Aug 31

 

Class discussion of Turner.

Make a list of Turner’s main ideas (title each idea). Write a couple of sentences beneath each idea title describing what the idea is or entails. POST TO DISCUSSION BOARD by Noon on Tuesday, Sept. 4 so everyone in the class can read the lists

ü BRING HARD COPY OF YOUR LIST TO CLASS on Wed., Sept. 5.

 

 

WEEK 2

SHORT ESSAY #1 ON TURNER (2-3 pages) due Monday, Sept. 17 (Assignment will be posted on Blackboard [UBLearns])

 

DATE

IN CLASS

HOMEWORK

M Sep 3

LABOR DAY

 

W Sep 5

Clemens 128

Ÿ   DAILY

Ÿ   Discussion board on Turner.

Ÿ   Incorporating quotations into the text of your essay.

Reread the entire Turner essay.

Begin hardcopy of FIRST DRAFT of short essay # 1 on Turner.

F Sep 7

 

Class discussion of Turner.

In groups, read each other’s first drafts. Write a final suggestion for revision.

Finish FIRST DRAFT of short essay #1. Have electronic version available for class on Monday.

Read in CC: Anderson, p. 640-652 (top of page).

Underline main ideas; take notes; consider whether or not, and how, Anderson has damaged Turner’s thesis about the American frontier.

 

WEEK 3

DATE

IN CLASS

HOMEWORK

M Sep 10

Clemens 128

Ÿ   DAILY

Ÿ   Discussion board on Anderson.

(SECOND DRAFT of writing assignment). Use an idea or fact from Anderson which helps your own argument about Turner.

W Sep 12

Discussion of Turner and Anderson: what problems did you have understanding, keeping track, of their arguments and evidence?

Reread Anderson with a view to determining how accurately Anderson reports Turner’s thesis.

Finish second draft of short paper #1. Have electronic version available in class on Friday.

F Sep 14

Clemens 128

Ÿ   At computers: the reviewing function of Word.

Ÿ   Open writing assignment save to desktop with a new name; exchange places with student next to you and REVIEW his or her draft.

Revise second draft of short paper #1. Hand in hardcopy in class on Monday.

Read in CC: Tompkins, pp. 587-96 (top of page).

 

WEEK 4

MAJOR PAPER #1 (5-6 pages) due on Wednesday, Oct 3. (Assignment will be posted on Blackboard [UBLearns])

 

DATE

IN CLASS

HOMEWORK

M Sep 17

 

Class discussion of Tompkins.

Read in CC: Tompkins, pp. 596-604. Pay attention to #3 under Idea for Rereading on p. 603.

 

W Sep 19

Clemens 128

At computer: DAILY

Projector: (Discussion) Remington paintings and engravings

http://www.fredericremington.org/images_start.php?gal=gallery/sub14/

 Read in CC: Silko, pp. 615-25. Pay attention to Idea for Rereading on pp. 624-25.

F Sep 21

Discussion of Silko

Reread Tompkins and Silko.

Make a list of events and interpretations of them which militate against the familiar stereotype of the American frontier. Critique the list: do you agree or disagree with Tompkins’ and Silko’s criticisms?

WEEK 5

DATE

IN CLASS

HOMEWORK

M Sep 24

 

Discussion of Tompkins and Silko.

Write first draft of major frontier paper. Remember to include quotations from the texts.

W Sep 26

Clemens 128

At computers: correct placement of quotations and citations in your paper.

Ÿ   At computers: Check the quotations in your draft. Have you discussed the quotations’ relevance to your main idea?

Ÿ   Has any quotation led you to a new idea of your own to include in the paper? Write, write.

Write second draft of major frontier paper.

Bring hardcopy to class on Friday.

F Sept 28

 

In groups: edit papers.

Finish second draft of frontier paper.

 

WEEK 6

For the next four weeks, we will read and think about violence and non-violence. As always take notes, asking questions, make comments.

q   GOALS: To understand the necessity of definition and discrimination. Both “violence” and “non-violence” have to be defined by the writer, since people will have differing ideas about his topic.

q   To understand the role of purpose in constructing definitions of controversial topics. Purpose is related to point of view and is often concealed by the latter.

q   To write an analytical essay which depends on close explanations or definition and purpose of a topic on violence/non-violence.

 

DATE

IN CLASS

HOMEWORK

M Oct 1

Clemens 128

Projection/discussion of volunteer second drafts.

Finish frontier paper. Bring hard copy to class on Wednesday.

W Oct 3

 

Ÿ   Freewrite at your desk (15 min): your ideas on “what is violence?”

Ÿ   Discussion of violence/nonviolence.

Read in CC: Nagler, pp. 511-23. Make a list of his main points.

F Oct 5

Clemens 128

DAILY

Discussion board on Nagler.

Review your freewriting from Wednesday on “what is violence?”

 

Write a short essay (3-4 pages) critiquing your own ideas in the freewriting according to what you have learned from Nagler. (You should pretend the freewriting was done by someone other than you so that you can treat it objectively.)

 

WEEK 7

Major paper on violence/non-violence due on Monday, Oct. 29 (Assignment will be posted on Blackboard [UBLearns])

 

DATE

IN CLASS

HOMEWORK

M Oct 8

Discussion of Nagler/your freewriting.

Read in CC: King, pp.471-87 (top).

W Oct 10

Clemens 128

DAILY (quiz on King?)

Discussion board on King.

Read in CC: Gandhi, pp. 444-60. Take notes with Nagler in mind.

F Oct 12

 

Discussion of King and Gandhi.

Continue to analyze Gandhi through Nagler’s discriminations among motives for violent or non-violent behavior.

 

WEEK 8

Conferences will be held all this week; only on Friday will classes be cancelled for conferences.

 

DATE

IN CLASS

HOMEWORK

M Oct 15

Clemens 128

At computers: construct 3 one-sentence topics for a major essay on violence/non-violence. Under each sentence write a paragraph of explanation.

ü Deposit this assignment in Blackboard dropbox.

 Reread King and Gandhi.

W Oct 17

 

In groups: share your three paper topics with group.

Offer suggestions for developing the topics or helping a fellow student decide on which topic to write the major paper.

Read in CC: Kappeler, pp. 505-511. How do Kappeler’s ideas on resistance (resistance to oppression, force, or violence from another [person, people, government]) complicate Gandhi’s and King’s ideas about non-violence?

F Oct 19

Clemens 128

CONFERENCES—No class

Write first draft of major paper on violence/non-violence.

 

WEEK 9

DATE

IN CLASS

HOMEWORK

M Oct 22

Discussion of Kappeler.

(Second draft): Edit first draft with quotations from the text in mind. Be sure you have discussed the quotations and made their relevance to your idea/s clear.

W Oct 24

Clemens 128

At computers: exchange files of first draft with student next to you. Using the Review feature of word, comment, offer suggestions for revision.

Š   Edit second draft for incomplete idea development, repetitiousness, irrelevancy

Š   Highlight in yellow sentences which state your main points.

Š   Check that you have explained and illustrated the points.

F Oct 26

 

In groups: edit group members’ papers for glaring writing errors and coherence of argument.

Finish major paper.

Hand in hard copy in class on Monday.

Ź  Have available electronic copies of your major frontier paper and your short essay on Turner in class on Monday.

 

WEEK 10

This week, in groups of four, you will turn your major frontier papers into a newsletter. This will involve editing the papers down to no more than two printed pages, adding graphics from the Web and new information if you have time to look for it, and writing an introduction to the newsletter.

You will need to choose an editor-in-chief who will be responsible for assembling the edited papers into newsletter format. The editor-in-chief will receive extra credit for this work.

 

DATE

IN CLASS

HOMEWORK

M Oct 29

Clemens 128

R  Demonstration of MS Publisher.

R  At computers: read another group member’s frontier papers with a view to shortening them. Mark passages for elimination; mark the sections of the paper you would like to see in the newsletter.

R  At tables: discuss naming the newsletter, what else besides your papers you would like to put in it? Can be postponed to Wednesday’s class.

Make the changes to your papers suggested by your editor and post the revised papers to your newsletter group’s bulletin board.

Read the revised papers of the other members of your group. Bring hardcopy of your revisions to class on Wednesday.

W Oct 31

 

Š   Demonstration of MS Publisher.

Š   All members discuss all the revised papers and make suggestions for further revisions.

Š   Discuss how you will write the introduction to the newsletter.

Š   If there is time, look for graphics on the Net.

Ÿ   Look for graphics on the Net. Download possibilities for inclusion in the newsletter.

Ÿ   Make final revisions to your papers. Do your part in writing the introduction.

Ÿ   Post or your materials to your group message board.

Ź  Bring electronic and hardcopy of all materials that will be in the newsletter to class on Friday.

F Nov 2

Clemens 128

At editor-in-chief’s computer: Do a mock-up of the newsletter.

 

Handout of next reading and writing assignments.

Editor-in-Chief will format the newsletter over the weekend and e-mail it to group members for final approval.

Ź  Hardcopy of newsletter due in class on Monday.

 

WEEK 11

DATE

IN CLASS

HOMEWORK

M Nov 5

Clemens 128

 

 

W Nov 7

 

 

F Nov 9

Clemens 128

 

Last day to resign w/o academic penalty

 

WEEK 12

DATE

IN CLASS

HOMEWORK

M Mov 12

 

 

W Nov 14

Clemens 128

 

 

F Nov 16

 

 

 

WEEK 13

DATE

IN CLASS

HOMEWORK

M Nov 19

Clemens 128

 

 

W Nov 21

 

FALL RECESS

F Nov 23

 

FALL RECESS

 

WEEK 14

DATE

IN CLASS

HOMEWORK

M Nov 26

 

(Final Paper Due)

W Nov 28

Clemens 128

 

Portfolio Workshop

F Nov 30

 

Portfolio Workshop

 

WEEK 15

DATE

IN CLASS

HOMEWORK

M Dec 3

Clemens 128

 

Portfolio Workshop

W Dec 5

 

Portfolio Workshop

F Dec 7

Clemens 128

 

Final portfolios due